An Exquisite Palette: A Dedication to Two

Here is a re-posting of a short piece I wrote for the fabulous site Art of Mourning. This brooch is truly a work of art in gold, black enamel and hairwork; it is dedicated to two women from the same family. It is another piece from my personal MOLAM collection of mourning jewellery.  Enjoy!

Click here to read the post For An Exquisite Palette: A Dedication to Two.

A mid-Victorian mourning brooch with hairwork dedicated to Agnes & Sarah Robinson

A mid-Victorian mourning brooch with hairwork dedicated to Agnes & Sarah Robinson

Memento Mori in Jewellery: Anachronistic 1780s White Enamel Ring

Here is a re-posting of an indepth analysis of a spectacular and unique ring circa 1780 which Hayden Peters wrote for his fabulous site Art of Mourning. This ring, dedicated to Ann Staneway, is from my personal collection of mourning jewellery.  Enjoy!

Click here to read the post Memento Mori in Jewellery: Anachronistic 1780s White Enamel Ring Where Memento Mori Meets Neo-Classicism.

Anne Staneway 1780 OB 18 Mar 1780 AE 20

Ann Staneway OB 18 Mar 1780 AE 20

Six Degrees of Thorvaldsen: The Figure of Night

Here is a re-posting of a piece I wrote for the fabulous site Art of Mourning. This brooch, Nyx, is from the MOLAM collection of yours truly. Although a humble piece, as you will read it is rich in its social & art historical context, and jewellery tradition. Happy reading!

Click here to read the post Six Degrees of Thorvaldsen: The Figure of Night

Nyx (Night) with her two children Sleep and Death, in Vulcanite

For Theirs is the Kingdom of Heaven

Here is a re-posting of a short piece I wrote for the fabulous site Art of Mourning. This brooch is from the MOLAM collection of yours truly.  Enjoy!

Click here to read the post For Theirs is the Kingdom of Heaven.

In Memory of My Dear Child

Spoilt For Choice: A Classic Seed Pearl Mourning Ring

Here is a re-posting of a short piece I wrote for the fabulous site Art of Mourning. This delightful mourning ring in its original Rundell and Bridge box is in the  MOLAM collection of yours truly. It’s fine craftsmanship is a delight to see. It also explains my decision making process for this particular piece.

Click here to read the post Spoilt for Choice: decision-making 101 for the collector.

Classic Georgian mourning ring dedicated to a Miss Tylor 1797 and Miss Jane Tylor 1804.

Henry Dove – A Memorial Ring

Mourning ring for Henry Dove. 18ct gold, London, hallmarked for the 1836/1837 period, reappropriated in 1851 and dedicated to Lieutenant Henry Dove RN.

This ring has been in my collection for only a few years. The unique aesthetic character of the ring appealed to me, but it wasn’t until Hayden Peters wrote this analysis of it that I understood what I was responding to. I hope you enjoy Hayden’s article from his Art of Mourning site.

Click here to read about the Henry Dove ring.

From the Dictionary of National Biography, edited by Leslie Stephen and published in 1888 we learn: The Doves are a Surrey family, with generations serving in the Navy. Lieutenant Henry Dove RN was married to Christiana Paterson, who gave birth to their son Patrick Edward Dove (1815 – 1873)a “philosophic writer”of some renown on the 31 July 1815 in Lasswade, near Edinburgh. An ancestor of Henry Dove was William, son of Thomas Dove, bishop of Peterborough. They had been settled in Devonshire since 1716 when Francis Dove, Commodore RNwas appointed Commissioner of the Navy in Plymouth.

Henry Dove retired from active service upon the peace of 1815, and held an appointment at Deal connected with the Cinque Ports. Henry Dove did not allow his son Patrick Edward to “follow his own ardent desire for naval service.” Instead, Patrick Edward went on to be educated in France and England but was expelled from school after leading a “rebellion” against the headmaster. Patrick Edward went on to study farming in Scotland and philosophy! Although there seems to be more information available about his son rather than Henry Dove, it still builds a portrait of a family. Upon Patrick Edward’s death a Professor J. S. Blackie wrote: “he combined in a remarkable degree the manly directness of the man of action with the fine speculation of the man of thought. Altogether, Mr Dove dwells in my mind as one of the most perfect types of the manly thinker whom I have met in the course of a long life.”  And when Patrick Edward died in 1873 he left behind a widow, and 3 of Henry’s grandchildren – a son and two daughters. Fortunately we have an image of a portrait of Henry Dove which appears in Hayden’s article above. However, there is also somewhere out there a portrait of Henry’s son – a “sketch by his friend Mr Seymour Haden”. I presume this is likely to be Francis Seymour Haden, prominent surgeon and etcher, who married the sister of the artist James Whistler. How extraordinarily interesting!

A photo of Seymour Haden from Wikipedia and the public domain.